I’ve moved!

Hi there!

If you landed here, I invite you to come on over to my new website/blog:

www.EnjoyDeliciousHealth.com

See you soon,

Simla

November 26, 2009 at 1:57 PM Leave a comment

Turkish Carrot-Lamb* Rice Pilaf and Radish Gazpacho (*with vegan option)

Comforting, warming, and invigorating, cooling at the same time. This duo is a perfect match for your taste buds and for the Fall season. The radishes, in particular, are fantastic to keep your immune system strong and help you clear out any bugs like the flu that you may catch, as they help dispel phlegm and have strong antioxidant properties.

The Carrot-Lamb Rice Pilaf
Since this is the main meal, one serving is a generous 1 cup of prepared rice pilaf. Makes about 4-6 servings.

Ingredientshavuclu pilav

1.5 cups brown rice, rinsed (Turkish recipe traditionally uses white rice, but I’m making this more fiber- and nutrient-rich this way)
3 cups of chicken stock or vegetable stock
2 medium or 1 very large carrot, washed and cut into 1″ long matchsticks
1 lb of lamb stew meat, excess fat removed and cut into small (~ 1/2″) cubes
1 medium yellow onion, sliced into thin half moons
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 TBS ground Allspice (add more, to taste, after cooking)
1/3 TBS ground cinnamon (add more, to taste, after cooking)
2 TBS olive oil for the carrots
3 TBS olive oil for the onions & lamb
2 tsp sea salt, more to taste
1/2 tsp black pepper, more to taste

Directions

  1. In a medium or large skillet, warm 2 TBS of olive oil on low-medium heat, then add the carrots and sautee until tender but not overcooked (about 8-10 minutes).
  2. Set carrots aside in a bowl to cool.
  3. In a large stockpot or casserole pot with a well fitting lid, warm up 3 TBS of olive oil on low-medium heat. Once oil is warmed up (be careful it’s not too hot or smoking), add onions along with with 2 tsp sea salt and stir occasionally on low-medium/medium heat until softened.
  4. In the meantime, bring to a boil the stock in the same pan used for cooking the carrots.
  5. Add the cubed lamb, cumin, and black pepper to the onions and continue to stir. The meat will first let go of its juices and then soak them back up. Wait until the meat has soaked up all its juices and has been nicely browned before continuing.
  6. Add the rinsed brown rice, allspice, and cinnamon to the meat and onions. Stir until the rice is warmed through.
  7. Add the boiling stock to the rice/meat/onion mix and stir a couple of times to dislodge anything stuck to the bottom of the pan.
  8. Tightly close the lid, bring to a boil, then turn your flame down until there’s a brisk but low simmer in the pot. The rice should take about 40-50 minutes to cook.
  9. Check the rice after about 35 minutes, and turn down the heat if the liquids are boiling off too fast.
  10. Once the rice is cooked, turn off the heat, fluff the rice with a rice paddle or large serving fork and let the rice “rest” for about 15 minutes before serving. Taste before serving and adjust the spices to your liking. The cinnamon-allspice blend should taste balanced – neither one should overpower the other.

The Radish Gazpacho (you can make this a day ahead of time)
One serving is approximately 1/2 – 3/4 cup. Makes about 4-6 servings.

Ingredients

4 cups filtered cold water
2 bunches of radishes, greens removed, washed, and grated finely
4 large garlic cloves, mashed
Juice from 1 large lemon (more, to taste, after preparation)
1 TBS pomegranate syrup (you can find this in the Middle Eastern / ethnic section of your grocery store, or boil down 1/2 cup of 100% pomegranate juice to make your own – you can make more and store the rest in a glass container in the fridge)
1 TBS dry mint (more, to taste, after preparation)
2 tsp dry oregano (more, to taste, after preparation)
1 tsp sea salt (more, to taste, after preparation)

Directions

  1. Mix all the ingredients, except for the water. Let stand in the fridge for at least an hour before serving, for the flavors to intermingle. It’s even better the next day.
  2. Add the water about 15 minutes before serving.
  3. Adjust lemon juice / mint / oregano / pomegranate syrup to taste. The gazpacho should taste sour-sweet, mostly sour, with a nice lemony kick to it.
  4. Serve chilled but not too cold.

Variations:

  • Vegan: For the rice pilaf, use vegetable broth instead of chicken broth. Instead of lamb, add peas, roasted almonds or almond slivers, and finely chopped kale, and navy beans. The Radish Gazpacho is already vegan.

Enjoy!

If you share this recipe, please include this blurb with it:

This recipe shared with you courtesy of Delicious Health, Inc., a health, nutrition, and lifestyle consultancy whose mission is to transform busy bodies into healthy, balanced beings (TM). Learn more about Delicious Health at www.enjoydelicioushealth.com or www.delicioushealthblog.com. Have a deliciously healthy day!

October 3, 2009 at 5:58 PM 3 comments

7 Healing Herbs: What to Have in Your Fall / Winter “Medicine Cabinet” (a.k.a your pantry)

Herbs. So underrated. Their potent flavors liven up any dish graced with their fresh crispness or dry, crumbly comfort. And your immune system rejoices when garnering their support. Perfect for the Fall and Winter seasons when we face an onslaught of viruses, bacteria, and other would-be invaders.mint

Here, I’ve highlighted just a few of the amazing healing herbs you should have in your pantry plus some easy tips and tricks for using them in everyday dishes. These herbs are easy to find and easy to use. They are all antioxidant powerhouses with dozens of beneficial phytonutrients (plant-based nutrients).

And, remember:  herbs are potent. Just because they’re good for you doesn’t mean you need to or should eat a lot of them. Typical serving sizes are anywhere from 1/2 – 3 TBS of fresh herbs or 1/2 – 2 tsp of dry herbs, depending on taste. Just like with any food (“healthy” or not), moderation is key. Here, I’m referring to herbs that you can eat as part of meals, not special herbal oils or medicinal preparations, which may require you to get personalized advice from an herbal expert (for example, parsley oil can be used to induce labor, which you certainly don’t want to do if you’re otherwise healthfully pregnant).

Parsley
From the same family as carrots, celery, and fennel, parsley is a versatile herb that usually gets dismissed as a garnish. It’s one of my personal favorites and I always have a little “parsley tree” sitting in my fridge, with the stems submersed in a cup of water to keep it vibrant. Parsley contains one of the highest levels of chlorophyll of any edible plant. Chlorophyll is a breath freshener and a fantastic blood purifier. Parsley is a digestive aid, can help dry up mucous-y conditions and helps in the treatment of ear infections and earaches. It contains several times the vitamin C content of citrus and has high levels of provitamin A, calcium, magnesium, and iron. It can work as a diuretic, though, so be sure to drink plenty of fluids if you are down with the flu or a cold.

Thyme
Apart from being a fantastic herb to cook with, thyme is a natural antiseptic that has antibacterial and antiparasitic properties. It also has antispasmodic tendencies; coupled as a digestive aid, it can help soothe gastrointestinal distress. It can also loosen phlegm as an expectorant, in case you’re feeling somewhat mucous-y and don’t have parsley on hand.

Dill
Delicate dill is a digestive aid and infection fighter as an antibacterial. Also known as a calming agent, along with basil.

Oregano
Similar to thyme, oregano is an expectorant and digestive aid, as well as an antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic, antifungal) herb. It’s also been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. If you’re not pregnant or on blood-thinners or other medications, you can try a simple tea like the one I like to make if my system feels a bit rundown:  fill an empty teabag (you can get them at almost any coffee shop or grocery store) with 1 tsp of dried oregano and steep it 3-5 minutes for a refreshing, warming tea, up to three cups a day. Don’t do this more than 2-3 times a week, just to be on the safe side. I repeat: this is not conducive for a daily tea habit.

Rosemary
A helpful decongestant and antimicrobial, and powerful antioxidant used since the good ol’ times to preserve meat and keep it from spoiling, along with thyme (now, that’s a powerful antioxidant!). You can prepare Rosemary as a tea to help with digestive issues or as a decongestant – refer to the Oregano example.

Mint
Not surprisingly, the source of mint’s lovely aroma is also the source of many of its many healing properties:  the oil called menthol. Mint has been shown to kill the herpes simplex virus and is a proven antibacterial as well as decongestant, anesthetic, digestive aid, and muscle antispasmodic.  Peppermint tea is a fantastic treat any time of day, although pregnant women should only drink the tea brewed very weakly, as the antispasmodic properties could relax the lining of the uterus.

Basil
Basil, oh, basil, how I love thee. Let me count the ways:  you’re an antimicrobial (anti-bacterial/viral/fungal/parasitic), fever reducer, concentration improver, immune system regulator, adrenal (stress hormone) regulator, and just plain delicious. One of my favorite teas (as any client of mine who has rummaged in my tea drawer knows) is Holy Basil, or Tulsi, tea. A brand called Organic India makes a good one. Try it out.

So, run out and stock up on these green herbs that belong in your Fall / Winter pantry. Fresh or dry, doesn’t matter. But it’s fun to use both, as they lend themselves to different preparations and flavor profiles in foods.

How to Use Herbs

The fresh herbs are delicate, so rather than cook with them, fold them into cooked meals right before serving, or sprinkle the finely chopped herb on top before serving, such as on top of grains, soup, or stews, or make a fresh herb salad and add in other favorite ingredients. Fresh herbs will last up to a week. Store fresh parsley, rosemary, oregano, and dill like I do – with their stems in water. I set them in a tumbler on the side ledge of my fridge and they flourish there all week long, reminding me to tear off a handful every time I open the fridge door. For mint and basil, wrap them up in a dry paper towel (or just wet the ends of the towel near the stems’ ends) and store in the veggie bin away from light and direct blasts of cold air in the fridge.

The dry herbs, if stored properly away from heat and light, will last you quite a while, and are fantastic as teas, meat or poultry rubs, for flavoring stews and soups while cooking, sprinkled on top of grains with maybe some sesame seeds, and in salad dressings.

And you can always dehydrate fresh herbs to make your own dry herbs. Just lay them out on a clean, dry towel, in direct sunlight if possible, until they are completely dried up, then crumble up and store in a cleaned, reused herb bottle, preferably glass.

Recipes

Check out some of my recipes that make liberal use of herbs:

Aegean Summer Herb Salad

Radish Gazpacho

***

© 2009 Delicious Health, Inc.

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR EZINE OR WEB SITE?
You may, as long as you include this complete blurb with it:

“Simla Somturk Wickless, MBA, CHC, CNE, Founder of Delicious Health, Inc., is an integrative health, nutrition, and lifestyle coach and change agent whose mission is to transform Busy Bodies into healthy Balanced Beings (TM). To learn how to increase your energy, tame your stress, and take back control of your health, register for her free monthly eZine at www.enjoydelicioushealth.com.”

October 3, 2009 at 4:03 PM 1 comment

Meditation for Health and Healing Teleclass – begins Oct. 11, 2009

Meditation for Health and Healing Teleclass from 29Gifts.org

Angel Stork, Energy Expert and 29 Gifts Meditation Teacher (and one of Simla’s personal mentors!), will help you find a sense of healthy balance and develop simple, new techniques to focus your energy for vital health. This class is appropriate for anyone dealing with an acute or chronic health challenge, as well as those who want to build on their current healthy foundation. The iStock_000006891127Medium_BALANCED_ROCKSclass is also beneficial for anyone who is healing past wounds from trauma, abuse or those dealing with the impacts of emotional or psychological imbalances.

The visualization-based style of meditation we teach is appropriate for experienced meditators as well as total beginners who have trouble even sitting still for five minutes.

THIS CLASS WILL SELL OUT SO CLAIM YOUR TICKET NOW!
(see below for special Delicious Health discount code)

You will learn how to:

  • Ground and center yourself so you can clear your heart of judgment and fear, which can help foster a sense of dis-ease.
  • Cultivate a sronger relationship with yourself as a healthy being and develop a more healthy perspective.
  • Uncover limiting believes and reframe them into a new vision of your healthy self.
  • Make space for compassion and change, tap into “lost” energy and open to divine support for healing.

Live TELECLASS DATES:
Class 1: Sunday October 11, 2009
Class 2: Sunday October 18, 2009
Class 3: Sunday October  25, 2009 – –

CLASS TIME:
All classes are a live 45-minute call at 5 pm pacific; 6 pm Mountain; 7pm Central; 8 pm Eastern

ALL CLASSES WILL BE RECORDED AND POSTED IN A PRIVATE DISCUSSION GROUP ON 29Gift’s WEBSITE. If you miss a class you can listen to the recording before our next class. The recordings are also available so you can practice the meditation on your own between classes. The private discussion group is a tool so you can post questions and observations over the course of the class and get support from Angel, myself and your fellow classmates.

Investment in your health: $45 for all three classes – only $15 per class.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER.

Delicious Health FRIEND DISCOUNT: Register by Monday, Oct 9th and save $10. You’ll get all three classes for only $35. What a bargain. To claim your savings just click the red link on the registration form that says “Enter Discount Code” and type  in “friend”.

Call-in information (a 712-area code) will be provided to all registrants via email prior to our first class.

October 3, 2009 at 11:52 AM Leave a comment

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

Do you have an Invisible Illness? Welcome to the club!

Groucho Marx, comedian and actor, once said, “I don’t want to belong to any club that will accept people like me as a member.” The Invisible Illness “club” is like that for me. I was invited – against my will – to this club in the summer of 2006. And then, just like Mr. Marx, decided to withdraw my membership. I now live in near/full remission. [Search for “Simla’s Story” on this blog to find posts that go further into details about my life living with and healing from invisible illnesses.]

I’m posting the following “30 Things” as a contribution to highlight the start of National Chronic Invisible Illness Awareness Week 2009 TODAY, Sept 14, 2009. II Week 09 is hosting a 5-day F*R*E*E Virtual Conference with 20 fantastic speakers who are vibrant, well-versed in the art of living with invisible illness, and there to offer you and/or the ones you care about support and encouragement and entertaining, engaging information. Register and attend this conference by clicking here.

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know
by Simla Somturk Wickless of
www.enjoydelicioushealth.com

1. The illness I live with is:
Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, immunotoxicity, undifferentiated connective tissue disorder, multiple chemical sensitivity (all in remission – 95% of the time)

2. I was diagnosed with it in the year:
2007

3. But I had symptoms since:
2006, and maybe even years earlier on some of the conditions but wasn’t diagnosed properly

4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is:
Change my career (from management consultant to health & nutrition consultant)

5. Most people assume:
That somehow I’m stronger than they are or that my medical conditions must not have been very serious because I was able to get to the point where I now live in full remission. Both are incorrect.

6. The hardest part about mornings are:
Waking up when my body is not ready to wake up – a feeling of utter and painful exhaustion.
Or if I ate gluten the day before: feeling deeply exhausted and having inflamed, painful joints and soft tissue as a result.

7. My favorite medical TV show is:
Grey’s Anatomy, because of the drama, not the medicine.

8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is:
My laptop.

9. The hardest part about nights are:
Used to be the all-over itching caused by my drug-induced liver inflammation and excruciating nerve pain in my legs. Nowadays, occasional nerve sensitivity in my legs, or if my adrenals are off, insomnia.

10. Each day I take __ pills & vitamins.
Down to about 10 from 45+. WOO HOOOO!

11. Regarding alternative treatments I:
Bet my life on them and I won.

12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose:
Invisible. I’m a very private person. This way I get to choose how and where I share information about me.

13. Regarding working and career:
You must love the work you do to be truly healthy. I LOVE my work now. It feeds my health and soul. And I wouldn’t have found it had my illnesses not found me.

14. People would be surprised to know:
That I am thankful to my conditions for the strength of self, renewed life purpose, and revised priorities they brought to me.

15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been:
I don’t have all the freedoms I used to have, if I want to live in full remission, such as eating anything I want.

16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was:
Heal it to where, as long as I manage my triggers well by avoiding or mitigating them, I live pretty much in full remission.

17. The commercials about my illness:
Drive me nuts. Prescription medication should not be advertised on TV.

18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is:
When I couldn’t walk, it was walking.
When I couldn’t read, it was reading.
When I couldn’t think, it was thinking.
Now, living in remission, it’s the ability to eat whatever I want, as I have to be very mindful of certain foods triggering my symptoms. I’m planning on overcoming that too.

19. It was really hard to have to give up:
Cheese and coffee and wheat, as these are some of the foods that trigger my symptoms.
I’ve regained the ability to do almost everything else that matters to me.

20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is:
Blogging! =)

21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would:
I now have those days back and I am grateful for every second.

22. My illness has taught me:
That doctors are fallible, that our medical system is very broken, and that it is not designed to deal effectively with chronic, systemic conditions.
That “alternative” medical approaches are my default choices.
That the body, mind, and spirit are all connected and will all heal given half a chance.
That we are healthy when our world is healthy, and vice versa.
That healing requires you to get to know your body and and its signals, to listen to your intuition, to decide to get your health back and then follow through no matter how hard it gets or how many naysayers there are.
That real, beautiful, delicious food is fantastic medicine.

23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is:
But you look great! (When I was really suffering. Now it’s ok. =)

24. But I love it when people:
Are patient. When I shuffled vs walked, when I couldn’t be social… my family and true friends came through and showed it in their kind patience.

25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is:
“It’s ok to feel bad, but it’s not ok to feel bad about feeling bad.” (from my husband)

26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them:
You are not your illness.

27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is:
How it can be a blessing in disguise and a huge life lesson (or several hundred).

28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was:
When I was bed-bound and couldn’t walk for several months, my husband surprised me by carrying me out to the car he had rented (we don’t own a car) and driving me to the beach so we could roll down the windows and I could get some fresh air and sun on my face.

29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Week because:
It’s very important to me that those living with an invisible illness know and see from others’ experiences that they CAN live well and even heal fully from a chronic invisible illness.

30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel:
Warm and fuzzy, and happy that you took the time to understand a little better. Thank you.

September 14, 2009 at 12:04 AM 5 comments

Helloooo, Sugar!

Why do you butter me up, buttercup, just to let me down?

and

Ah sugar, ah honey honey
[You are my candy…]
And you got me wanting you

and

Pour some sugar on me…

All popular lyrics, all probably written by sugar addicts. It’s not hard to imagine: lovesick songwriter, writing the lyrics as she snarfs down a pint of icecream or as he drowns his sorrows with a wine spritzer.

Ok, just having some fun there but – really – you know those sugar cravings? The ones that seem to take over beyond any reason, or hang around on the periphery of your consciousness until you take those fateful steps towards your hidden stash, vending machine, or corner Starbucks? Sugar cravings love to come alive around 3-4pm, right after dinner, or (and?) when you get home from another stressful day at work. Or when you’re bored. Or sad.

It’s not your fault. We’re genetically programmed to crave sugar. Way back when, that probably translated into us raiding bee hives. These days we can bypass the stings and just make do with a chocolate chip cookie… or three.

Sugar cravings are the result of a constellation of factors and they’re very unique to you. No two people, no two bodies are alike. Your life habits, food choices and patterns, emotions, brain chemistry, blood chemistry, stressors, time of day, and nutritional deficiencies all feed into it. Pun intended.

While we tend to associate “sugar cravings” with baked goods, chocolate, and candy, I include artificial sweeteners, alcohol, and pasta, bagels, most cereals, and other refined-carb-heavy foods in there as well. Sugar can wreak havoc on your body, contributing to or directly causing stress, anxiety or depression, energy slumps, yeast infections, autoimmune symptoms, migraines, diabetes, IBS, and a weakened immune system. Sugar feeds cancer and has even been connected to alcoholism. My personal pet peeve regarding sugar is that it saps me of my fabulous natural high when I do choose to have some. Not so sweet.

The good news is that you can rid yourself of sugar cravings in as little as a week. You can learn to deconstruct your cravings, learn about your body’s signals and what they’re telling you, and harness that deep power to your advantage so that you can have uplifting, steady energy throughout the day. No more guilt trips or dreading the scale. No more jittery nerves. No more crashes and burns. No more distracting cravings.

Wouldn’t it be great to no longer be a slave to sugar but just enjoy it when you feel like it, without g-u-i-l-t? The process is fascinating, fun, extremely effective, and deceivingly simple.

If you want to get there, join me on September 17th for my live webinar, Sugar Blues! Click here for details and to sign up. I may not give this webinar again, so join me while you can! It may just change your life.

And if you don’t, don’t say I didn’t try to help you, sugar.

September 10, 2009 at 4:55 PM Leave a comment

SUGAR BLUES! Live Webinar Sept 17, 2009

It’s baaaa-aaack!

In Spring 2009, I hosted a Sugar Blues class and some of you couldn’t make it, and some of you just found out about it and want it now! And there’s a good chance it may be the LAST TIME I do this LIVE.

Well…

This time, I’m presenting it as a WEBINAR so you can again watch and listen no matter where you are!

* * *

Sugar Blues!

Understand and Reduce Your Cravings Once and For All
& Learn How to Have Sugar as Part of a Healthy Lifestyle

Sugar. Tantalizing. Trouble… Or is it?

Join Simla Somturk Wickless, Certified Health Counselor and Nutrition Educator, and founder of Delicious Health, Inc., in this LIVE ONLINE WEBINAR to learn:

  • Shocking facts about sugar and what it does to your body and mind.
  • How you can deconstruct and understand your sugar cravings like never before.
  • The Top 10 steps for reducing sugar cravings for good!
  • How to enjoy sugar as part of a healthy lifestyle.

Do you crave sugar? You’re not alone! Sugar is highly addictive and can wreak havoc on your body in ways you may have never imagined. Yet, there is no warning label! Sugar is a growing part of the American diet, has many different names, and hides in many foods. Join us for the Sugar Blues webinar and learn about the impacts of sugar, the fascinating reasons WHY we crave sugar, and lots of practical ideas to overcome your addiction and enjoy sugar as part of a healthy diet.

Curious? Well you have to be there to find out!

Scroll down to SIGN UP and get your special discount.

Here’s what some past participants have said:

It was a pleasure to participate in the Sugar Blues tele-class. I am pleased to learn that there might be ways to address sugar cravings with activities. Along with that, I also realize that it is one step in the path towards eating right and living well. Thank you for helping me get started!
– Anita P., Entrepreneur & High Level Executive

Thank you the Sugar Blues Teleclass today. You had a good overview of sugar, and what I particularly liked was that you gave 10 concrete examples of craving causes and another 10 steps for dealing with those cravings.  I think it’s great that you take a holistic approach to the topic.  Sugar is very much part of the conversation in our house! I think that’s where resources like yours come in – they help in the lifelong journey of good health. Many thanks.
– Maria Nicolacakis, Busy Mom

I am a person that has a passion for a healthy lifestyle and someone who prides themselves on being quite knowledgeable about health and nutrition.  The Sugar Blues class was not about restriction, but rather about revelation into human patterns and tendencies.  It went beyond my expectation by delving into the science behind cravings and providing analysis and action tools for making small yet significant changes to my diet and lifestyle. As a competitive runner, I know that what I learned and will apply will help me regulate my energy for peak performance. I believe everyone has something to learn from Simla’s class that can compliment his/her unique situation. I know I did!  Thank you, Simla!
– Casandra Nied, Marathon Runner and Busy Professional

Simla was a very energetic, happy, and knowledgeable instructor. Her presentation was everything I was hoping for when I signed up.
– Andy Wilder, Engineer

EVENT DETAILS

When
Thursday, September 17, 2009 from 5:30 PM PST / 8:30 PM EST

Where
Via Webinar – Call in or watch & listen via the web from anywhere – your office, your couch, …
You’ll get the web link and phone number after you sign up BELOW.

Hosted By
5 Mini Meals.com

Investment In Your Health – SIGN UP HERE
*An exclusive offer from Delicious Health*

Only $8 with Coupon

Enter coupon code DH5MM

===> CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP<===

We’ll have fun and you’ll have immediate, easy actions you can take to redefine your relationship with sugar right away!

I hope to “see” you there!

September 9, 2009 at 1:47 AM 1 comment

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